Mark Salinas – Insight and Action

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Posts Tagged ‘Sleep’

Dreams

Posted by Mark Salinas on January 19, 2009

During a typical lifespan, a human spends a total of about six years dreaming (which is about two hours each night). It is unknown where in the brain dreams originate, if there is a single origin for dreams or if multiple portions of the brain are involved, or what the purpose of dreaming is for the body or mind.

dreams

Some dream quotes:

“Dreams that do come true can be as unsettling as those that don’t.”- Brett Butler

“Hope is a waking dream.”- Aristotle

“Keep true to the dreams of thy youth.”-Friedrich von Schiller

“Dreams come true. Without that possibility, nature would not incite us to have them.”- John Updike

Why should you bother remembering your dreams?

1. Your dreaming mind has access to vital information that is not readily available to you when you are awake. Your dreams may reveal your secret desires and subconscious feelings.

2. In remembering your dreams, you will have an increased knowledge about yourself, bring about self-awareness and self-healing.  Dreams are an
extension  of how you perceive yourself. They can be a source of inspiration, wisdom,  joy and overall improved psychological health.

3. Learning to recall your dreams may help you become a more assertive person.  In remembering your dreams, you are expressing and confronting your feelings.

4. Dreams can help guide you though difficult decisions, relationship issues, health concerns, career questions or any life struggle you may be going through.

5. Remembering your dreams can help you come to terms with stressful aspects of your lives.

Maybe it is time to dream!

Sources: Dream Moods, Wikipedia

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Sleep

Posted by Mark Salinas on November 10, 2008

Nothing is more frustrating than not being able to sleep. Poor sleep habits/hygiene are among the most common problems encountered in our society. Trouble sleeping and daytime sleepiness can be indications of poor sleep hygiene.

Sleep hygiene is one of the often used term in sleep medicine today. It refers to the environmental and sleeplifestyle factors that can affect sleep. Good sleep hygiene practices can prevent the development of sleep problems and disorders.

What are some examples of good sleep hygiene?
1. Do not have television in the bedroom.
2. Stay away from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco especially at night.
3. Try to avoid exciting activities when too close to bedtime.
4. Block out light with heavy curtain.
5. Block out noise with ear-plugs or install double layer window glass.
6. Try not to read in bed.
7. Try to go to bed and get up at the same time.
8. Do not eat heavy meal late at night.
9. Avoid rich, spicy and fatty foods.
10. Make sure you have a comfortable bed with a good mattress and pillow.
11. Make sure the room temperature is reasonably cool.
12. Take a warm bath before go to bed.
13. Avoid napping at the day time. If you really need a nap, limited your nap time to 30-45 minutes only.
14. Do regular exercise but not before bedtime.
15. Practice relaxation techniques before bed such as yoga, deep breathing, etc.
16. Don’t take your worries to bed. Leave all of your worries about job, life, daily, school, behind when you go to bed.
17. Sleep when only you feel sleepy.

*Source Ezine

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Sleep and Work

Posted by Mark Salinas on June 9, 2008

Are your moods up and down at work lately? Maybe you aren’t getting enough sleep? Your job, home and family responsibilities can make sleep a challenge. Include money issues, relationship issues an unexpected illness and quality sleep may be even more difficult to come by.

You may not be able solve all of the factors that interfere with your sleep, but you can create an environment and include habits that might assist in a more restful night.

Try these suggestions provided by the Mayo Clinic if you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep:

  • Don’t eat or drink large amounts before bedtime. Eat a light dinner about two hours before sleeping. If you’re prone to heartburn, avoid spicy or fatty foods, which can make your heartburn flare and prevent a restful sleep. Also, limit how much you drink before bed. Too much liquid can cause you to wake up repeatedly during the night for trips to the bathroom.
  • Avoid nicotine, caffeine and alcohol in the evening. These are stimulants that can keep you awake. Smokers often experience withdrawal symptoms at night, and smoking in bed is dangerous. Avoid caffeine for eight hours before your planned bedtime. Your body doesn’t store caffeine, but it takes many hours to eliminate the stimulant and its effects. And although often believed to be a sedative, alcohol actually disrupts sleep.
  • Exercise regularly. Regular physical activity, especially aerobic exercise, can help you fall asleep faster and make your sleep more restful. Don’t exercise within three hours of your bedtime, however. Exercising right before bed may make getting to sleep more difficult.
  • Make your bedroom cool, dark, quiet and comfortable. Create a room that’s ideal for sleeping. Adjust the lighting, temperature, humidity and noise level to your preferences. Use blackout curtains, eye covers, earplugs, extra blankets, a fan, a humidifier or other devices to create an environment that suits your needs.
  • Sleep primarily at night. Daytime naps may steal hours from nighttime slumber. Limit daytime sleep to about a half-hour and make it during midafternoon. If you work nights, keep your window coverings closed so that sunlight, which adjusts the body’s internal clock, doesn’t interrupt your sleep. If you have a day job and sleep at night, but still have trouble waking up, leave the window coverings open and let the sunlight help wake you up.
  • Choose a comfortable mattress and pillow. Features of a good bed are subjective and differ for each person. But make sure you have a bed that’s comfortable. If you share your bed, make sure there’s enough room for two. Children and pets are often disruptive, so you may need to set limits on how often they sleep in bed with you.
  • Start a relaxing bedtime routine. Do the same things each night to tell your body it’s time to wind down. This may include taking a warm bath or shower, reading a book, or listening to soothing music. Relaxing activities done with lowered lights can help ease the transition between wakefulness and sleepiness.
  • Go to bed when you’re tired and turn out the lights. If you don’t fall asleep within 15 to 20 minutes, get up and do something else. Go back to bed when you’re tired. Don’t agonize over falling asleep. The stress will only prevent sleep.
  • Use sleeping pills only as a last resort. Check with your doctor before taking any sleep medications. He or she can make sure the pills won’t interact with your other medications or with an existing medical condition. Your doctor can also help you determine the best dosage. If you do take a sleep medication, reduce the dosage gradually when you want to quit, and never mix alcohol and sleeping pills. If you feel sleepy or dizzy during the day, talk to your doctor about changing the dosage or discontinuing the pills.

If you’re having problems sleeping more than three times a week for a month’s time, see your doctor. You could have a sleep disorder, such as obstructive sleep apnea or restless legs syndrome. Identifying and treating the cause of your sleep disturbance can help get you back on the road to a good night’s sleep.

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