Government Websites to visit

 

Goverment

Ten Resourceful, Informative Government Websites 

1. Healthfinder.gov

Official site of Affordable Care Act. A site with access to tools, information.

A solid source for information and current uptdates.

Health Conditions and Diseases /New technology in the medical field. Healthy top to bottom.

2. Census Bureau.gov

The census is to figure out how many seats each state receives in the House of Representatives.

But the census is much more than just apportioning seats. It’s a once-a-decade chance to track the shifting demographics of America.

How many people live in big cities? How many children live in each household? What is the nation’s racial and ethnic breakdown? Federal and state governments rely on census data to budget for social welfare programs and design public transportation systems. Cities and private industry use demographic figures to plan hospital expansions and housing developments, and assess the need for new schools or new strip malls.

The Bureau collects population data for the purposes of accurately congressional districts, the federal government uses census data, among other reasons, to determine: The allocation of federal funding for education programs in states and communities.

Every year, federal and state governments use census data to allocate more than $400 billion toward public services and infrastructure [source: U.S. Census Bureau].

Because this data is so important, all U.S. residents (regardless of immigration status) are technically required by law to faithfully and accurately fill out the census form. When Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann announced that she would only answer the first question on the 2010 census form — and not provide individual names, ages or ethnicities of household members

3.Congress.gov

The mission of Library Services is to develop qualitatively the Library’s universal collections, which document the history and further the creativity of the American people and which record and contribute to the advancement of civilization and knowledge throughout the world, and to acquire, organize, provide access to, maintain, secure, and preserve these collections.

4.Data.gov

The home of the U.S. Government’s open data You will find data, tools, and resources to conduct research, develop web and mobile applications, design data visualizations,

The heart of Data.gov is the catalog . The Data.gov catalog brings together datasets from hundreds of agency sources across the federal government and from 50 non-federal sources.

5.MultiState.US

MultiState Associates is the nation’s leading state and local government relations services firm. They uncover legislation and regulations of interest at all levels of government—federal, state, and local—whether potentially adverse or beneficial to their organization.

To solve our client’s needs, they identify the best advocates in the states and localities. They build and manage coalitions to amplify an organization’s voice. The resulting messages resonate with policymakers and constituencies.

Providing confidential benchmarking and strategy, they help optimize the government affairs function. Most importantly, they ensure our clients and their employees comply with federal, state, and local ethics and lobbying laws when carrying out their work.

6. IRS.gov

The funds donated, raised are neccesar taxes to contribute in many important areas. To name a small few. In addition to paying the salaries of government workers, tax dollars also help to support resources, our law enforcement police and our Park Patrol. Fire ladies and Men. Tax dollars are to ensure the bridges highway, road systems that are to provide trust safe travel on are safe and well spent-maintained. Taxes fund public libraries and parks, Schools.

7. USPS.com

USPS- all things delivered, to your home, business. The public staple, a mail box to drop off ones letters etc. a Post Office supplied with a P.O. box in many towns and cities.

8.USCIS.gov

They push for humanitarian programs that will be part of the protection advocacy group to individuals involving the United States displaced through Political, Civil unrest, Famine, and many are escaping death or torture and leaving their countries to live. (See the “Humanitarian” page.)

Citizenship (Includes the Related Naturalization Process)

Adoptions

Civic Integration

Much more

9.WhiteHouse.gov

Official site of the US Government

10. USA.gov

U.S. Government Services and Information

Find government information and services by topic.

Benefits, Grants, Loans

Consumer Issues

Disability Services

Disasters and Emergencies

Earth and the Environment

Find government information on energy, green technology, pollution, wildlife, and more.

Education

Find government information on education including primary, secondary, and higher education.

Government Agencies and Elected Officials

Find information for federal, state, and local government agencies and elected officials.

Health

Find health resources from the government.

Housing

Get information and services to help with finding and keeping a home.

Jobs and Unemployment

Find out how and where to look for a new job or career, get help if you are unemployed, and more.

Laws and Legal Issues

Learn how to report a crime, locate a federal inmate, research common U.S. laws, and file a complaint against the government.

Ten Government Sites with Endless Resources, Information History, Links, Up to date info and more .

 

Image: Pexels

Dreams

During a typical lifespan, a human spends a total of about six years dreaming (which is about two hours each night). It is unknown where in the brain dreams originate, if there is a single origin for dreams or if multiple portions of the brain are involved, or what the purpose of dreaming is for the body or mind.

dreams

Some dream quotes:

“Dreams that do come true can be as unsettling as those that don’t.”- Brett Butler

“Hope is a waking dream.”- Aristotle

“Keep true to the dreams of thy youth.”-Friedrich von Schiller

“Dreams come true. Without that possibility, nature would not incite us to have them.”- John Updike

Why should you bother remembering your dreams?

1. Your dreaming mind has access to vital information that is not readily available to you when you are awake. Your dreams may reveal your secret desires and subconscious feelings.

2. In remembering your dreams, you will have an increased knowledge about yourself, bring about self-awareness and self-healing.  Dreams are an
extension  of how you perceive yourself. They can be a source of inspiration, wisdom,  joy and overall improved psychological health.

3. Learning to recall your dreams may help you become a more assertive person.  In remembering your dreams, you are expressing and confronting your feelings.

4. Dreams can help guide you though difficult decisions, relationship issues, health concerns, career questions or any life struggle you may be going through.

5. Remembering your dreams can help you come to terms with stressful aspects of your lives.

Maybe it is time to dream!

Sources: Dream Moods, Wikipedia

Sleep and Work

Are your moods up and down at work lately? Maybe you aren’t getting enough sleep? Your job, home and family responsibilities can make sleep a challenge. Include money issues, relationship issues an unexpected illness and quality sleep may be even more difficult to come by.

You may not be able solve all of the factors that interfere with your sleep, but you can create an environment and include habits that might assist in a more restful night.

Try these suggestions provided by the Mayo Clinic if you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep:

  • Don’t eat or drink large amounts before bedtime. Eat a light dinner about two hours before sleeping. If you’re prone to heartburn, avoid spicy or fatty foods, which can make your heartburn flare and prevent a restful sleep. Also, limit how much you drink before bed. Too much liquid can cause you to wake up repeatedly during the night for trips to the bathroom.
  • Avoid nicotine, caffeine and alcohol in the evening. These are stimulants that can keep you awake. Smokers often experience withdrawal symptoms at night, and smoking in bed is dangerous. Avoid caffeine for eight hours before your planned bedtime. Your body doesn’t store caffeine, but it takes many hours to eliminate the stimulant and its effects. And although often believed to be a sedative, alcohol actually disrupts sleep.
  • Exercise regularly. Regular physical activity, especially aerobic exercise, can help you fall asleep faster and make your sleep more restful. Don’t exercise within three hours of your bedtime, however. Exercising right before bed may make getting to sleep more difficult.
  • Make your bedroom cool, dark, quiet and comfortable. Create a room that’s ideal for sleeping. Adjust the lighting, temperature, humidity and noise level to your preferences. Use blackout curtains, eye covers, earplugs, extra blankets, a fan, a humidifier or other devices to create an environment that suits your needs.
  • Sleep primarily at night. Daytime naps may steal hours from nighttime slumber. Limit daytime sleep to about a half-hour and make it during midafternoon. If you work nights, keep your window coverings closed so that sunlight, which adjusts the body’s internal clock, doesn’t interrupt your sleep. If you have a day job and sleep at night, but still have trouble waking up, leave the window coverings open and let the sunlight help wake you up.
  • Choose a comfortable mattress and pillow. Features of a good bed are subjective and differ for each person. But make sure you have a bed that’s comfortable. If you share your bed, make sure there’s enough room for two. Children and pets are often disruptive, so you may need to set limits on how often they sleep in bed with you.
  • Start a relaxing bedtime routine. Do the same things each night to tell your body it’s time to wind down. This may include taking a warm bath or shower, reading a book, or listening to soothing music. Relaxing activities done with lowered lights can help ease the transition between wakefulness and sleepiness.
  • Go to bed when you’re tired and turn out the lights. If you don’t fall asleep within 15 to 20 minutes, get up and do something else. Go back to bed when you’re tired. Don’t agonize over falling asleep. The stress will only prevent sleep.
  • Use sleeping pills only as a last resort. Check with your doctor before taking any sleep medications. He or she can make sure the pills won’t interact with your other medications or with an existing medical condition. Your doctor can also help you determine the best dosage. If you do take a sleep medication, reduce the dosage gradually when you want to quit, and never mix alcohol and sleeping pills. If you feel sleepy or dizzy during the day, talk to your doctor about changing the dosage or discontinuing the pills.

If you’re having problems sleeping more than three times a week for a month’s time, see your doctor. You could have a sleep disorder, such as obstructive sleep apnea or restless legs syndrome. Identifying and treating the cause of your sleep disturbance can help get you back on the road to a good night’s sleep.