Email Tips

Some reminders while using email:

Collect Emails: With the low cost of email communications, email trumps more costly marketing methods such as direct mail and telephone. A study by Jupiter Research found email campaigns targeted with web analytics can produce 18 times the profits of broad mailings. Relentlessly collect customer and lead email addresses all the time. Use a contact management program to handle your growing list.

Remove Obstacles: Customers want fast and easy communication from companies they want to do business with. Your website contact page should have your email address. Asking web visitors to fill in a form to send a simple mail will stop many in their tracks. Gather more customer information once you have gained the initial contact. If you are worried about being spammed, invest in a good spam protection program.

Avoid Sensitive Issues: Never handle sensitive issues by email. The chance for miscommunication can make matters worse. There are times when you need to pick up the phone or set up a face-to-face contact instead of taking the easy way out with email. When you are full of emotions, stay clear of your email.

Handle at one time: Don’t fall into the trap of reading emails and thinking I’ll respond later. Later never arrives and soon your inbox is full of important and unimportant mail. Scott Allen, Co-Author of “The Virtual Handshake” recommends “Most people configure their email reader to interrupt them every time an email comes in. This means you are interrupted throughout the day. Instead, we suggest keep your email reader closed most of the day. Only check email once a day.”

Limit length: We all lead busy, time-pressed lives. Receiving a long-winded email with one big paragraph creates a response to file for later use. Readers have a tendency to skim and miss critical details. Before you send out your email message, edit down to short sentences, add bullet points, and be concise. When someone opens your email they should be able to know within 10 seconds or less what your message is about.

Email

By Mark Salinas

“Have you had an email with an angry tone” hit your inbox?

In todays world it is important that an employee understands how to use email properly and with professional tact. Often I have seen responses to an email with much opinion and negativity attached, this could be easily misconstrued and backfire.

I believe we all have received an email that “got under our skin.” It would be in human nature to tap the heck out of the keyboard with all your frustration and respond angrily…”how could this person dare send me this?”

“STOP!”

Take a deep breath walk away and gather your thoughts. Upon your return you probably have calmed down a bit…hopefully? If not, try this… type a response on a word document, let it all out. When you are done DELETE it. Feel better?

Now type a response to the email and look it over a few times, I avoid inputting too many opinions if any at all. Try to keep the response to the facts. Acknowledge the persons point and look to add possible solutions. Use we and us often as you want to avoid personal attachment. Keep the tone of your response level, avoid caps. and exclamation points.