Confident Customer Servive

Often our delivery or how we convey a message to an individual could have a big impact on what we are trying to accomplish. When interacting with the customer I believe it is important to offer reassurance and confidence……take ownership.

Some phrases that I offer to a customer when interacting:

1. How may I help?
2. I can solve that issue.
3. I will take responsibility.
4. I am not certain, but I’ll find out.
5. I will keep you updated.
6. I will deliver it on time.
7. The job will be complete.
8. I appreciate your business.

9.Thank you and please <—-always important!

Some simple phrases that will go a long way. Of course one must follow up with results!

The customer is why you go to work. If they go away, you do, too.
-David Haverford

Six Behaviors That Cause Problems With Customers

6 common mistakes well-intentioned people make when it comes to dealing with unsatisfied customers. See tips on what NOT to do so that you’re well positioned to completely regain the trust of unhappy customers after any service issue.

1. Telling the customer he or she is wrong. NEVER tell a customer they are wrong. The customer will want to argue with you. If you know your customer is incorrect, it’s better to start off saying something like, “I thought the manual/contract read otherwise, but let’s take look.”

2. Arguing with a customer. You cannot win an argument with a customer. You can prove your point and even have the last word. You may be right, but as far as changing your customer’s mind is concerned, you will probably be just as futile as if you were wrong. Your goal in complaint situations is to retain the customer…you do NOT need to be right. Think carefully about the response you want to give and ask yourself, “Is my reaction one that will relieve the problem, or will it just relieve frustration? Will my reaction drive my customer further away? What price will I pay if “I” win the argument?” The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it.

3. Don’t tell a customer to calm down. Certainly, there are times when a calm disposition would make every one’s life easier, but telling your customer to calm down is rarely effective. Like you, your customers don’t like to be told what to do. Try this approach instead: “Clearly you’re upset and I want you to know that getting to the bottom of this is just as important to me as it is to you.”

4. Failing to apologize to customers in the wake of problems. One of the easiest and quickest ways to diffuse anger, create rapport, and regain goodwill with unhappy customers is to apologize. Offering an apology to a customer who experiences a problem should be a natural response from customer service providers. Yet, recent research reveals the startling fact that 50% of customers who voice a complaint say they never received an apology.

Not only does an apology give “soft benefits” such as creating calm, shaving minutes off of talk time, less stress on the employee, etc., it can also translate into significant and measurable savings in reduced lawsuits, settlement costs, and defense costs.

An apology does not have to be an admission of fault. It can be offered to express regret. For example, “I’m so sorry for any inconvenience this misunderstanding has caused you.”

5. Escalating voice. Avoid the temptation to yell just because your customer is yelling. You don’t want to get caught up in their drama. Instead, remain centered and calm, relying on your ability to communicate with diplomacy and professionalism.

6. Proclaiming to the customer: “This is all I can do.” You are there to help. Give your customer options and look for every way you can help.

Common Sense Customer Service

We always need to work on improving our customer service skills. Some points that could help:

1)Educate your customers about your products and services.

2)Make sure items are delivered in good condition. Call the customer after delivery and if a piece is not right, offer to fix it or replace it.

3)Offer your customers personal attention, even if they don’t buy anything. Engage them in pleasant conversation and find out why they’re not buying. Make use of what you learn.

4)Go out of your way to meet customer needs. One interior designer got draperies made for a client in a hurry so they would be ready for an at-home wedding.

5) Show appreciation. Make sure employees always thank customers for their business. Consider sending occasional handwritten thank-you notes.

6)RESPONSIVENESS…always respond to an email or voice mail within a consistent period time.

“A little common sense can go a long way!”